Note: In order to combine two of the author’s blogs, this post has been relocated from KathleenCremonesi.com. For those of you who have already viewed this post, my apologies for the repetition, and thank you for your patience. Original post date: February 28, 2015.

It’s wonderful to discover, and rediscover, a gem in your backyard. While attending the Seafood and Wine Festival in Newport, Oregon, I had the pleasure of rediscovering the amazing artisan cheeses of Oregon’s own Rogue Creamery.

Located in the Willamette Valley, Rogue’s cows graze in pastures that sit at 1,650-foot elevation along the Rogue River. The creamery was opened in the 1930s by Tom Vella and originally produced cheddar. According to their website, they produced 1 million pounds for four years running during WWII to ship to troops. After an enlightening trip to France in the 1950s, the creamery began to produce the first blue cheese produced in caves west of the Missouri River.

The creamery currently handcrafts a variety of cheeses from raw, certified sustainable, rBST-free milk — cheddars from delicate rosemary to spicy habanero, and blues from the lighter Oregon Blue to the earthy Smokey Blue. My hands down favorite, at least this year, is the Rogue River Blue.

Rogue River Blue is made but once a year, from milk gathered between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice, and is cave-aged for one year. After aging, the forms are wrapped in syrah grape leaves that have been macerated in Clear Creek Pear Brandy. Doesn’t that sound amazing? It’s not cheap, and it shouldn’t be with what goes into making it, so I ponied up and brought a wedge of heaven home from the festival.

Oh, what a beautiful cheese. Tiny crystals speckle the deep blue veins, producing a party for your tongue which is creamy and crunchy, smooth and striking all at once. Although there are certainly myriad ways to enjoy this beauty, I’m not willing to dilute its flavor just yet and have focused on simple pairings, such as a slice of perfectly ripened pear.

It’s no wonder Rogue River Blue has won so many awards, including Best Blue Cheese in the World (London, 2003) when up against such powerhouses as British Stilton, Italian Gorgonzola, and French Roquefort. It has also won Best American Cheese, Super Gold World Cheese Award, and Best in Show twice at the American Cheese Society (2009, 2011).

Rogue Creamery’s motto, “handmade locally, celebrated globally,” is spot on. Yet, I’ve never turned an I5 road-trip into a “Rogue trip.” With all the times I’ve made the jaunt between Eugene and San Francisco, I’ve never detoured five-minutes off the interstate in Central Point, Oregon, to visit their shop. Next excursion south, I will, and I expect it will be the highpoint of the drive. In the meantime, specialty grocery stores, here I come.

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Puff Pastry is my Friend

November 15, 2010

How about a quickie? Appetizer, that is…

With the holidays coming up, there’s a lot of eating to be done, and therefore a lot of cooking and sharing. One of my favorite and absolute easiest appetizers to make is whatever’s-in-the-fridge-on-puff-pastry. I usually have two or three cartons of frozen pastry on hand this time of year, ready to take out and load up with goodies. In less than an hour, I can have scrumptious appetizers ready to serve.  Anybody can.

Don’t always have an hour’s notice? Defrost some puff pastry sheets, lay them flat between parchment paper, and keep them in the fridge just waiting for those unannounced guests to drop by. I’m guessing they’d keep for at least a couple of weeks, but I’d bet they’ll never last that long.

Puff Pastry Appetizers

While you’re pastry’s defrosting, raid your refrigerator and pantry for goodies, such as:

  • goat or other yummy cheese
  • sauteed greens
  • onions to caramelize
  • artichoke hearts
  • cherry tomatoes
  • pesto
  • leftover pasta sauce
  • olives
  • capers
  • anchovies
  • Artichoke and Chili Dip
  • grilled veggies
  • pine nuts
  • smoked salmon
  • bacon marmalade

Need I go on? The list is limited only by your imagination and the contents of your refrigerator. Go ahead, experiment.

Got a sweet tooth instead?

  • cream cheese, dark chocolate and chopped dried cherries or cranberries
  • any flavor of jam that pleases your palate
  • powdered sugar for dusting (after baked)
  • Hmmm… what about peanut butter and chocolate chips in a Reese’s-like concoction? Topped with a dollop of vanilla ice cream? Yep. I could do that… right now!

To Assemble the Appetizers

I used to just unfold the sheet of pastry dough on a floured board, cut it into 9 or so squares, plop some stuff on top and bake. Then my lovely friend Rosa taught me a little trick that kicks the presentation of these beauties — and their ability to hold a good amount of toppings — up a notch or two. It’s as easy as 1 2 3.

Folding Puff Pastry for Appetizers

  1. Cut the thawed, floured pastry sheet into squares — as many as you’d like, but smaller than 2″ x 2″ might be tricky to fold.
  2. Fold the square in half and cut along the two short sides — all the way down to the long end, and almost , but not quite meeting at the point.
  3. Unfold, and cross the cut-through points over to the other side.

Voila! You’ve just made a beautifully shaped appetizer, complete with a cavity to fill and even a handle to hold while eating!

Ready to Bake!

In this batch, I made two kinds:

I grated a bit of Parmigiano over the top, baked them in a 400 degree oven for 15 minutes, and wow! I would have no problem making a meal out of these. Maybe I’d add a side of soup for nutrition’s sake, but the smallest bowl I could find. Special thanks to my friend Helene who turned me onto the bacon marmalade!

Yum! Yum! Yum!

Serve warm, and don’t forget the wine!

Enjoy~